Potential Employment and Earnings outcomes of recent graduates

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The Department for Education has published statistics on Employment and Earnings Outcomes of Higher Education Graduates: Experimental data from the Longitudinal Education Outcomes (LEO) dataset. You can view the full publication here.

 

One year after graduation

  • Graduates are most likely to be in sustained employment and least likely to be in further study without an accompanying sustained employment spell.
  • The proportion of graduates in sustained employment one year after graduation has increased steadily since 2003/04 to a high of 61.2 per cent for 2012/13 graduates. In contrast, the proportion of graduates in further study only has decreased in the same timeframe, from 10.6 per cent for 2003/04 graduates to 6.7 per cent for the 2012/13 cohort.

 

Three years after graduation

  • As with figures for one year after graduation, cohorts in more recent years are more likely to be in sustained employment and less likely to be in further study than cohorts in earlier years.
  • The proportion of graduates in sustained employment three years after graduation is higher than figures one year after graduation, whereas graduates are less likely to be in further study at the three year time point.

 

Five years after graduation

  • Graduates are more likely to be in sustained employment at the five year time point than they were one or three years after graduation
  • However the proportion of graduates who are in further study, sustained employment (or both) falls between three and five years after graduating

 

Ten years after graduation

  • The 2003/04 graduating cohort represents the first group for which graduates can be reliably matched to employment outcomes ten tax years after graduation.

 

Earning data also reveals the median earnings five years post-graduation for those graduating in 2003/04 was £26,000 compared to £25,500 for those who graduated in 2008/09.

 

The Department for Education also recently published Widening participation in higher education: 2016.

  • 85% of private school pupils went to higher education, compared with 62% of those from state schools by the age of 19 in 2013-14.
  • The figures reveal a drop from 66% to 62% in state school pupils progressing to university between 2012-2013 and 2013-2014.
  • For the 2013-14 cohort, the estimated progression rate for state school and college pupils to the most selective Higher Education Providers was 23%, compared to 64% for independent school and college pupils.
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